Endings

The Elder Flower Orchard,

I’ve avoided writing this post, just as I avoided actually putting the Bongo up for sale.  It’s a bit of a wrench.  The end of something rather wonderful.

We bought the Bongo when my kids were 3 and 5.  They were so little when I look back.  The girls are now 9 and 11 and we’ve simply outgrown our lovely van.  We’ve had six wonderful summers of campervanning. I am so happy that it was a massive part of their early childhood.  When we bought the van we decided to use it as much as possible.  Pretty much any weekend from May to September where the weather forecast was ok and no other significant events were taking place we would pack up and go.  Sometimes just for a night, usually two.  We gained so much.

We explored hidden corners of the UK, some very close maybe only 30/45 mins drive away or sometimes a few hours drive.  We all learned an awareness and appreciation of the beauty of the land we live in.

Wookey Farm

My husband has a stressful job and it can be hard for him to switch off at weekends, being out camping forced him to slow down and nature worked its balm on him and all of us, each time.  Quality family time.

The best campsites are places you can walk from or around. When the girls were little our walks would be relatively short with a focus or game to keep things going.   Over the years our walking adventures have expanded.  Now we all walk up mountains and a 5 mile ramble is a no challenge at all.  It was camping that led us naturally into this activity.  Walking is just the best family activity but that’s another post!

Our enthusiasm for camping was infectious.  We often camped alone but we loved it when friends came too. Over the years we have cemented friendships over the campfire and created wonderful shared experiences.

The sea is quite far from where we live.  It is just possible to spend a day by the sea on a day trip but it’s a very long day.  The freedom of the campervan allowed us to enjoy sea views, sea air and beaches of every kind so much more often than we could have managed any other way.  Once we went to the beach early in the morning in our pyjamas!

Eweleaze Farm

Having a campervan at the beach is just brilliant.  Make a cup of tea, get changed without getting sand in every orifice, have a nap in the roof, a cold beer from the fridge, a place to shelter if the weather turns unexpectedly.  Just brilliant and one of the main things I will miss about owning a van.

There a few incredible things so easy to access and so often ignored as the night sky.  We’ve sat and watched the stars emerge, taught ourselves about the constellations, seen shooting stars, satellites and the ISS and simply been mesmerised by the beauty of the night sky.

We aren’t giving up camping, but I know, without the Bongo and with the children’s expanding social lives, we will be doing it a lot less.  We are all going to miss it.  Bye bye Bongo, its been totally amazing.

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Why you must fit a coolant alarm to your Bongo!

New year, new job.  The Bongo is now being put to use as my daily commute vehicle.  Not ideal as it is rather heavy on the petrol, but it is very reliable and, despite being larger than the average run around, it is fantastically manoeuvrable. So I’m not worried about it being up to the task.

Second day of new job. The coolant alarm has gone off, though intermittently.  So I top up the reservoir up with water.  It’s been at least 18 months since it was previously topped up so I’m not too worried a bit of evaporation etc is to be expected.  It takes a fairly small amount of water to top it up to the required level.

Evening of second day of new job, I’m driving across town in heavy traffic, a little stressed out at getting to the childcare setting to pick up the girls before it closes.  Nearly there and the alarm goes off again.  Not good.

The childcare setting is in a tiny village on the edge of Bath, it is pitch black and freezing cold.  I borrow a small bottle of water from the kind people at the setting.  I top up the reservoir but with only a low powered torch I can’t see very well if the reservoir is full or not.  I drop my keys into the engine bay. Stress levels are rising sharply.  A passing practical angel manages to retrieve my keys from the engine bay.  I’m all fingers and thumbs.  We get in the car and start driving.  The lanes between here and home are narrow and dark. The alarm goes off again.  Shrill, insistent.  My stress levels are hitting the roof.  I know I need to stop but it isn’t far home and there is nowhere safe to stop. I keep going. The alarm keeps shrieking.  The girls’ chatter is silenced.

We are nearly home and in the light of a street lamp I suddenly realise there is steam coming from the engine.  I stop.  I know I shouldn’t have driven when the alarm is going off, now there is steam.  Although the heat gauge on the dashboard hasn’t moved I’m now feeling certain I must have done serious damage to the engine.  The AA come quickly as I’m stopped on a tricky junction.  A leaking radiator is diagnosed and he helps me get the van home. I feel sick, if I’ve cooked the engine the cost will be in the thousands.  It may not even be worth repairing.

Fast forward a week.  There is a message on the answer phone. It’s the garage.  I’ve been dreading this call. ‘Your car is ready, come and collect it when you are ready’. That’s it. No damage to the engine block, no hideously expensive repair bill.  Just a new radiator, a fairly simple job in a Bongo, and we are back on the road.  I whoop!

But please imagine, if we had not had a coolant alarm fitted there would have been no indication of a problem, the temperature gauge barely budged, I could easily have not spotted the steam in the darkness and I wouldn’t have given it that extra top up.  The first sign may have been the engine simply blowing up.  The cost would have been huge.

If you have a Bongo get a coolant alarm fitted. The Bongo’s temperature gauge is notoriously unreliable and the coolant system is prone to leaks.  Ignore this advice at your peril!

 

 

 

Campsite Review: Camp Hartland, Nr Wareham, Dorset.

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Where: Camp Hartland, Rural Camping, Hartland Stud, Norden, Wareham BH20 5DU

Contact: No website but Facebook page here.

How much: £7.50 for 11 year olds +, £3 for 3 -10 year olds, under 3’s free.  Only open in August.

Fires:  Ideally use spots that have previously been used but if not possible it is ok to start a new pit.  (I have confirmed this with the owner).

Firewood: Not available to buy on site

Facilities: Two Family shower rooms which also house two flushing toilets plus two composting toilets in another field.  Undercover, outdoor washing up area with hot water. Continue reading

Get Kids Camping

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A while ago I wrote this post ‘10 Reasons why you should take your kids camping‘. It went down pretty well actually.  People seemed to like it.  Today I was contacted about a new campaign from the Camping and Caravanning Club ‘Get Kids Camping’  (they pretended not to have read my post but I reckon I was the inspiration….)

Anyway, despite their refusal to name me as their inspiration, I am very happy to publicise the fact that (social) science has now backed up my assertions.  Clever people from Plymouth University have confirmed that camping is not only great but also great for kid’s education. Continue reading

Air Bed or SIM?

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Let’s face it a good night’s sleep is the single most important element of a successful camping trip.  With a full night’s comfy sleep under your belt you can cope with anything the day throws at you. To achieve this you will require warmth, a pillow to suit your requirements, and of course a comfortable surface to lay your weary bones upon.  So how do you choose?  Air bed or SIM? Continue reading

Uniqlo and getting stuff for free.

When I started this blog it wasn’t my intention or even my expectation that I would start getting ‘stuff for free’.  To be honest I never really imagined I’d have enough readership to warrant attracting PR chaps and chapesses to give me products to review. However, as time went by and it turned out people shared my camping obsession and maybe even found it a tiny bit useful, I did start getting a few contacts.  I have turned a few down, I am careful only to review stuff I genuinely think is good quality, and of interest to people who are into camping. Continue reading